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Knives, Knives, Knives

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Re: Knives, Knives, Knives
Post by cthia   » Tue May 21, 2019 7:59 am

cthia
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Stilettos, stilettos stilettos. I've been fascinated by these gems since procuring one on my very first visit to Italy as a little tyke. I talked my older brother into buying me one. I got the largest design that was half my body weight at the time, and was bigger than my hand. I'm part native American and I was made to carry the thing in one of our sheaths designed to carry knives, because the larger stiletto didn't have a safety switch. All of my brothers ended up getting a stiletto after I did, though several of them opted for one of the smaller designs with a safety switch. I traded for theirs over the years when they lost interest and I have them in a window display case dedicated to Italy. They've asked for it back a few times, "Nope." The gems have long since been banned, but continue to show up in movies.

I must have deployed that thing a thousand times the first day I got it, putting its intriguing mechanism through its paces.

"Swish! Swish! Swish! Swish! . . ."

I could have sent in data regarding its reliability. My mom told me constantly "Stop that!"

"Ok mom, swish!"

Son, your mother says I have to hang you. Personally I don't think this is a capital offense. But if I don't hang you, she's gonna hang me and frankly, I'm not the one in trouble. —cthia's father. Incident in ? Axiom of Common Sense
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Re: Knives, Knives, Knives
Post by TFLYTSNBN   » Tue May 21, 2019 2:04 pm

TFLYTSNBN
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Posts: 1519
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edgeworthy wrote:
TFLYTSNBN wrote:https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-48186035

That's about one day of Gun deaths in America!
https://www.amnestyusa.org/issues/gun-v ... xUEALw_wcB



Two-thirds of the "gun deaths" in the US are suicides. Historically; the US has had low suicide rates compared to other "more civilized" countries that have stringent gun control laws. Obviously; people who want to commit suicide can do so easily enough using other weapons.

The number of accidental gun deaths is small and has been declining for decades.

The only plausible causitive connection is guns and homicide. Interestingly; when the US homicide rate surged in the 1960s, the percentage of homicides commited with guns decreased. Guns didn't cause the increase. When the US homicide rate plummeted during the late 1990s to 2000s, the percentage of homicides committed with guns increased. Guncontrol didn't cause the decrease.

Of course politicians will continue to beat the gun drum to distract people from the indisputable correllation between low crime clearance rates and high homicide rates. If the American people were to ever begin judging police, prosecutors and judges by their job performance, we would be arresting many of them for loitering, incompetence, dereliction of duty and even complicity.
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Re: Knives, Knives, Knives
Post by TFLYTSNBN   » Tue May 21, 2019 2:08 pm

TFLYTSNBN
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Posts: 1519
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cthia wrote:Stilettos, stilettos stilettos. I've been fascinated by these gems since procuring one on my very first visit to Italy as a little tyke. I talked my older brother into buying me one. I got the largest design that was half my body weight at the time, and was bigger than my hand. I'm part native American and I was made to carry the thing in one of our sheaths designed to carry knives, because the larger stiletto didn't have a safety switch. All of my brothers ended up getting a stiletto after I did, though several of them opted for one of the smaller designs with a safety switch. I traded for theirs over the years when they lost interest and I have them in a window display case dedicated to Italy. They've asked for it back a few times, "Nope." The gems have long since been banned, but continue to show up in movies.

I must have deployed that thing a thousand times the first day I got it, putting its intriguing mechanism through its paces.

"Swish! Swish! Swish! Swish! . . ."

I could have sent in data regarding its reliability. My mom told me constantly "Stop that!"

"Ok mom, swish!"


I find that I can open most folding knives with a simple flick of the wrist that generates enough accelleration and torque on the blade to do the job.
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Re: Knives, Knives, Knives
Post by TFLYTSNBN   » Mon May 27, 2019 8:17 pm

TFLYTSNBN
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Re: Knives, Knives, Knives
Post by Daryl   » Tue May 28, 2019 5:00 am

Daryl
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Location: Queensland Australia

This had me puzzled until Google came to my aide. I quote "in American English usage, the name stiletto can also refer to a switchblade knife with a stiletto- or bayonet-type blade".
Never saw that usage, before. To us a stiletto is an Italian design slim pointed fixed blade dagger, and a folding knife is a "Flick Knife".

TFLYTSNBN wrote:
cthia wrote:Stilettos, stilettos stilettos. I've been fascinated by these gems since procuring one on my very first visit to Italy as a little tyke. I talked my older brother into buying me one. I got the largest design that was half my body weight at the time, and was bigger than my hand. I'm part native American and I was made to carry the thing in one of our sheaths designed to carry knives, because the larger stiletto didn't have a safety switch. All of my brothers ended up getting a stiletto after I did, though several of them opted for one of the smaller designs with a safety switch. I traded for theirs over the years when they lost interest and I have them in a window display case dedicated to Italy. They've asked for it back a few times, "Nope." The gems have long since been banned, but continue to show up in movies.

I must have deployed that thing a thousand times the first day I got it, putting its intriguing mechanism through its paces.

"Swish! Swish! Swish! Swish! . . ."

I could have sent in data regarding its reliability. My mom told me constantly "Stop that!"

"Ok mom, swish!"


I find that I can open most folding knives with a simple flick of the wrist that generates enough accelleration and torque on the blade to do the job.
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Re: Knives, Knives, Knives
Post by cthia   » Tue May 28, 2019 6:51 am

cthia
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Posts: 11274
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2014 12:10 pm

Interesting, but how can a stiletto be considered a "fixed blade" when it moves? To be fair, long ago, as far as Americans were concerned a switchblade was a spring-loaded blade which sprang out sideways - by American design, now hard to find. But the operative word to Americans, though, is any spring-loaded knife which is operated by a switch.

Do any of you foreigners know, or Americans remember, exactly what prompted them to be banned here in America? It should be rather obvious.
Daryl wrote:This had me puzzled until Google came to my aide. I quote "in American English usage, the name stiletto can also refer to a switchblade knife with a stiletto- or bayonet-type blade".
Never saw that usage, before. To us a stiletto is an Italian design slim pointed fixed blade dagger, and a folding knife is a "Flick Knife".


TFLYTSNBN wrote:
cthia wrote:Stilettos, stilettos stilettos. I've been fascinated by these gems since procuring one on my very first visit to Italy as a little tyke. I talked my older brother into buying me one. I got the largest design that was half my body weight at the time, and was bigger than my hand. I'm part native American and I was made to carry the thing in one of our sheaths designed to carry knives, because the larger stiletto didn't have a safety switch. All of my brothers ended up getting a stiletto after I did, though several of them opted for one of the smaller designs with a safety switch. I traded for theirs over the years when they lost interest and I have them in a window display case dedicated to Italy. They've asked for it back a few times, "Nope." The gems have long since been banned, but continue to show up in movies.

I must have deployed that thing a thousand times the first day I got it, putting its intriguing mechanism through its paces.

"Swish! Swish! Swish! Swish! . . ."

I could have sent in data regarding its reliability. My mom told me constantly "Stop that!"

"Ok mom, swish!"


I find that I can open most folding knives with a simple flick of the wrist that generates enough accelleration and torque on the blade to do the job.

Son, your mother says I have to hang you. Personally I don't think this is a capital offense. But if I don't hang you, she's gonna hang me and frankly, I'm not the one in trouble. —cthia's father. Incident in ? Axiom of Common Sense
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Re: Knives, Knives, Knives
Post by Daryl   » Wed May 29, 2019 6:23 am

Daryl
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Posts: 2870
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 12:57 am
Location: Queensland Australia

Could have been that they were favoured by youth gangs. After all what are they useful for? A carving knife carves roasts and so on, but a "flick knife" is somewhat like a handgun, only good for killing or injuring humans, somewhat like the original Italian Stiletto.
Growing up on a station (ranch) we all carried pocket knives (multiple blades, smallish but slow to open) or sheath knives (Bowie types). When hunting we also use skinning knives for pelts to sell.
A classic Australian film "Crocodile Dundee" has a scene where he is confronted by a young youth gang member with a flick knife, then shows him his sheath knife (big Bowie) which intimidates him.
For the majority on here who are US citizens I suggest that you Google "Stiletto" and see that your name usage is unique.
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Re: Knives, Knives, Knives
Post by cthia   » Wed May 29, 2019 7:40 am

cthia
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Posts: 11274
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Daryl wrote:Could have been that they were favoured by youth gangs. After all what are they useful for? A carving knife carves roasts and so on, but a "flick knife" is somewhat like a handgun, only good for killing or injuring humans, somewhat like the original Italian Stiletto.
Growing up on a station (ranch) we all carried pocket knives (multiple blades, smallish but slow to open) or sheath knives (Bowie types). When hunting we also use skinning knives for pelts to sell.
A classic Australian film "Crocodile Dundee" has a scene where he is confronted by a young youth gang member with a flick knife, then shows him his sheath knife (big Bowie) which intimidates him.
For the majority on here who are US citizens I suggest that you Google "Stiletto" and see that your name usage is unique.

I don't doubt that our nomenclature was unique. They were a new technology to us, compared to the rest of the world. And the way marketing works, they'd have to be labelled in the best possible fashion which would appeal to American consumers.

They were banned when it became quite clear that they were stealthy, concealed weapons, even when held in your hand. When your opponent has a knife and you don't, you back away if you're smart. But when your opponent had one of these switchblades, you didn't know what you were up against until it was too late. He'd deploy it seconds before slicing your throat. When they were first introduced, they were new. Most people were unaware of the stealthy new knife that deployed seconds before injuring -- or killing -- you. There were even variable length stilettos that were made which deployed in two or three different lengths depending on the position of the switch. Those things were immediately banned.

Son, your mother says I have to hang you. Personally I don't think this is a capital offense. But if I don't hang you, she's gonna hang me and frankly, I'm not the one in trouble. —cthia's father. Incident in ? Axiom of Common Sense
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Re: Knives, Knives, Knives
Post by TFLYTSNBN   » Sat Jun 01, 2019 4:42 pm

TFLYTSNBN
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Posts: 1519
Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2018 8:58 am

cthia wrote:Interesting, but how can a stiletto be considered a "fixed blade" when it moves? To be fair, long ago, as far as Americans were concerned a switchblade was a spring-loaded blade which sprang out sideways - by American design, now hard to find. But the operative word to Americans, though, is any spring-loaded knife which is operated by a switch.

Do any of you foreigners know, or Americans remember, exactly what prompted them to be banned here in America? It should be rather obvious.
Daryl wrote:This had me puzzled until Google came to my aide. I quote "in American English usage, the name stiletto can also refer to a switchblade knife with a stiletto- or bayonet-type blade".
Never saw that usage, before. To us a stiletto is an Italian design slim pointed fixed blade dagger, and a folding knife is a "Flick Knife".


TFLYTSNBN wrote:




I find that I can open most folding knives with a simple flick of the wrist that generates enough accelleration and torque on the blade to do the job.


Stilettos knives were favored by Italian gangs back in the day when most Italian immigrants still struggled to speak English. Bowie knives which were far more lethal than stiletos were still okay because they favored by tenth generation natives.
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Re: Knives, Knives, Knives
Post by TFLYTSNBN   » Sat Jun 01, 2019 4:42 pm

TFLYTSNBN
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Don't get me started about the Bowie Spoon.
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