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Recipes?

Pull up a chair and talk to Sharon about care and feeding of an author, life in the literary world, crochet, or just life in general.
Recipes?
Post by phillies   » Tue Nov 16, 2010 11:25 pm

phillies
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After all, it is about feeding the author, so we could contribute ours to Sharon.
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Re: Recipes?
Post by SharonWMBO   » Fri Nov 19, 2010 9:42 pm

SharonWMBO
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Since David is the cook in our family, I'm not sure that sending me any recipes would help! I make a mean boiled water, but not too many people like it...Not sure why ;) !!! I also do a great heat and eat meal too. Thanks, Sharon
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Re: Recipes?
Post by phillies   » Fri Dec 03, 2010 9:10 pm

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So would the author be interested in recipes?
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Re: Recipes?
Post by SharonWMBO   » Sat Dec 04, 2010 9:38 pm

SharonWMBO
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phillies wrote:So would the author be interested in recipes?


Always! He loves just about every type of food out there!
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Re: Recipes?
Post by namelessfly   » Sat Dec 04, 2010 9:57 pm

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How about my recipe for marinated Elk Steak. First, get an Elk.

I've got it filed away her somewhere so I'll get it out and post it for everyone.

It works good on moo cow flank steak.
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Re: Recipes?
Post by Howard T. Map-addict   » Mon Dec 06, 2010 12:55 pm

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It reads like the Famous Vicksburg Rabbit Steak Recipe!

HTM

namelessfly wrote:How about my recipe for marinated Elk Steak. First, get an Elk.

I've got it filed away her somewhere so I'll get it out and post it for everyone.

It works good on moo cow flank steak.
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Re: Recipes?
Post by phillies   » Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:36 pm

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Lamb

One of many Greek recipes. This one is a bit different is that it is not avgolemono. I always cook unsalted, and allow the victims, errh, guests, to salt for themselves.

Take a boneless leg of lamb. Peel from the lamb the outer membrane that the butchers usually leave in place. The underfat can be dropped into the bottom of the roasting pan. Slice the lamb perpendicular to the grain much of the way through in 1/2-3/4" slices. Insert garlic and a modest shaving of feta cheese into each slice. Cover surface with the juice of 1-2 lemons. Dust heavily with rosemary -- your mileage may vary -- or sage. Place on a rack in the roast pan--there will be a decent amount of liquid and this is not boiled lamb. Stuff edges of half of pan with small potatoes, cut in half or so.

Roast or bake. Your mileage may vary. I tend to use a constant 325. Texts recommend preheat to 400, insert lamb, cook for 10-20 minutes, drop temperature to 350, fill rest of area around pan with quartered or whole artichokes. Roast or bake to taste, something like 2 hours.

Reserve liquid from lamb.

Fine chop 2-3 large onions and caramelize in olive oil. Add liquid from lamb; bring to a boil. If the liquid is really watery you may need to boil it down a bit first. Some cooks will also add a modest amount of tomato paste. Add orzo (rosa marina) appropriate to amount of liquid from lamb, and a bit more, and cook. The onions should be a decent part of the total volume. As 'done approaches, add juice and zest of a lemon.

A lettuce etc salad with Italian dressing and Greek strained unflavored yogurt and olives are appropriate.

There are good Greek wines, such as mavrodaphne. Of the common wine and liquor importers, Cambas is highly recommended but others are also good.
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Re: Recipes?
Post by phillies   » Wed Dec 22, 2010 3:34 pm

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Cooking the orzo.

I should have noted three choices here.

#1
1) Cook the onions in olive oil and lamb fat, until the onions are turning light brown.

2) Boil the orzo in water until done.

3) Drain the onions and the orzo and mix.

#2 Pasotto a traditional pasta technique
1) Cook the onions in olive oil. Add the uncooked orzo to the onions. Add a small amount of cooking liquid and bring to a simmer or not quite a slow boil. Keep stirring --the pan bottom needs regular scraping-- and adding a modest amount of cooking fluid at a time. Continue to do this until the pasta is cooked. The outcome is ready to eat without draining. The pasta is absorbing water so draining is not needed, if you are careful near the end to add liquid very slowly.

#3
Replace the orzo with cous-cous. In the process, the onions are drained, the fluid is reserved and lamb fat and broth are added to the exact required volume. The cooking liquid is then returned to the onions and brought ot a boil. The measured correct amount of cous-cous is added, the pot is covered, and the heat is turned off.
The cous-cous cooks itself without human intervention.

With cous-cous curry powder is appropriate, though from a different national background, and is eaten with plain yogurt.
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Re: Recipes?
Post by phillies   » Fri Dec 31, 2010 10:25 pm

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Fettucine with Artichoke

One can artichokes. Drain carefully, reserve the liquid, and fine chop.

1-2 large onions. Wash and fine chop.

Liquid from artichokes and water -- most people use huge amounts relative to what is needed. Do not copy them. Bring to boil. Add olive oil to cover surface. Add 1 pound fettucine. Cook al dente.

While that is going on:

Heat an eighth of a pound of butter, and a similar amount of olive oil. Cook the onions so that they brown. Red onions for color are an option. Then add

garlic -- 2-3 heaping tablespoons. You are cooking the garlic so that it just changes color. The change in color is quite delicate.

Now add the chopped artichokes, and lower the heat. You are making them hot, not cooking them.

At some point in there, drain the fetucine carefully. Empty thoroughly the pot in which the fetucine was cooking and return to the heat so that it dries and becomes hot.

In fairly rapid succession, return the fetucine to the cooking pot. There will be a sizzle. Stir to reheat it. Add the butter, oil, onions, garlic, and artichoke mixture. Stir so that the oil and butter coats the fetucine and the rest is mixed.

Option -- As a last ingredient, add a moderate amount, like 1/4 cup, of parmesan or romano cheese. You have to be very careful so that the cheese does *not* melt; that kills its flavor and texture, both of which matter.

Serve.

Note that I do not add salt or pepper; that's for the eater.

The ratio of vegetables to pasta is a matter of taste. You can use much more or rather less.
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Re: Recipes?
Post by Paks   » Sat Jan 22, 2011 7:20 pm

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Boston Baked Beans Optional Ingredients

1 lb Navy Beans ¼ cup Honey
1/3 cup Molasses ¼ cup Beer
1 cup Brown Sugar ¼ cup Maple Syrup
1 tsp Mustard (Ground) Salt & Pepper
¼ lb Bacon (Sliced into chunks & half cooked) Garlic Powder
1 cup Small Pearl Onions ½ cup Bar-b-q Sauce
1/3 tsp Baking Soda

2 quart Baked Bean Pot

Rinse beans, put into pan, add 1/3 tsp Baking Soda, bring to a boil, let simmer for 2 minutes.

Reserve 2 cups of Liquid.

Put the beans into the Baked Bean Pot, add the Reserve Liquid, add the rest of the ingredients. (Add one or a couple or several of the optional ingredients as you like).

Put into preheated oven of 350 for 4-6 hours. Add more water as needed. Don’t stir.

Remove from oven 30-45 minutes before serving. Leave in Baked Bean Pot.
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