Topic Actions

Topic Search

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Galactic Sapper, Google [Bot] and 10 guests

Stories you wish were told?

Join us in talking discussing all things Honor, including (but not limited to) tactics, favorite characters, and book discussions.
Re: Stories you wish were told?
Post by DDHv   » Sat Aug 27, 2016 11:20 am

DDHv
Captain of the List

Posts: 494
Joined: Thu Sep 11, 2014 5:59 pm

Maldorian wrote:I want to know more about Bolthole!

What about a Spystory placed there? Remember the solarian Agent from the shortstories? I say: Crippler and the fake whormhole.

Has Bolthole a habitable Planet? Is there a chance, that Treecats settle down there?

What about a treecat Genius? A treecat intrested in science, who understand human tecnology and has some ideas.....

I want to see the first reaction when the new scientist at Bolthole will be intodruced, "a six leged piece of flur".

Yes, yes, yes!

A short featuring cooperation between Shannon, who seems to be good at using existing tech, and Sonja, who seems to be best at devising new tech. I wonder if all of the above could be included
;)
Last edited by DDHv on Sun Sep 04, 2016 9:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Douglas Hvistendahl
Retired technical nerd

Dumb mistakes are very irritating.
Smart mistakes go on forever
Unless you test your assumptions!
Top
Re: Stories you wish were told?
Post by Fox2!   » Sat Aug 27, 2016 12:24 pm

Fox2!
Captain of the List

Posts: 541
Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 1:34 am
Location: Huntsville, AL

George J. Smith wrote:
ncwolf wrote:Shoot, I just want to know if that guy Ensign Helen Zilwicki had a crush on (was falling in love with?) survived the attack on Manticore.


(Or as LMB put it in A Civil Campaign (if I recall correctly), "…not only was love contagious, it was highly contagious.")


Yes he did, he was evacuated to the planet surface in the drill.


The other question is what happened to Ginger and Wanderman. He was on the fab side, which was not evacuated. She was on R&D, but the senior staff was going to perform an inspection for proper storage of classified material, etc., before the boffins evacuated.

Did they both, somehow, survive? Just one? Neither?
Top
Re: Stories you wish were told?
Post by Vince   » Sat Aug 27, 2016 1:10 pm

Vince
Vice Admiral

Posts: 1547
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2010 11:43 pm

Fox2! wrote:The other question is what happened to Ginger and Wanderman. He was on the fab side, which was not evacuated. She was on R&D, but the senior staff was going to perform an inspection for proper storage of classified material, etc., before the boffins evacuated.

Did they both, somehow, survive? Just one? Neither?

Weyland evacuation details:
Mission of Honor wrote:End of Chapter 27

“Well, I’m undoubtedly the most unpopular officer in Weyland,” Claudio Faraday said with an air of satisfaction. “For that matter, I might well be the most unpopular officer in the entire Beta subsystem!”
“I think that might be going just a bit far, Sir,” Marcus Howell replied. “At least as far as the entire subsystem’s concerned. Although, now that I think about it, they probably aren’t too fond of you down on Gryphon at the moment, either.”
“Nope. And I imagine I may be hearing a little something from the bean-counters back at Admiralty House, too.” Faraday sounded a bit more serious, but his air of contentment was unabated. “We’ve probably just written off—what? ten percent?—of the station’s life pods, after all.”
“Not to mention shutting down the entire R&D section until we get the pods recertified, Sir,” Howell pointed out respectfully.
“Oh, thank you for recalling that little detail to my attention, Marcus!”
“One of the things chiefs of staff are for, Sir.”
Faraday glowered at him, but the vice admiral didn’t seem able to work up much wattage. Then he allowed his chair to come upright, planted his elbows on his desk, and leaned forward over his folded forearms.
“Actually,” he said much more seriously, “the downtime bothers me most. But I don’t expect Admiral Hemphill to kick up much dust over it. I know most people think of her as the tech weenies’ tech weenie, but she’s got a lot better understanding of the realities than some of her research people out here do.” He shook his head. “Frankly, I think quite a few of them haven’t figured out they’re actually in the Navy and hence subject to the Service’s little foibles, like making sure they’re up to date on relevant emergency procedures. And even for most of the others, the thought that anyone might possibly want to hurt them never enters their minds! Which doesn’t even consider the fact that genuine accidents can happen even aboard the most modern space station.”
Howell nodded. He wasn’t sure he agreed with Faraday’s decision to actually evacuate the space station and send all but a tiny caretaker detachment down to the planet Gryphon. He was perfectly ready to admit that the readiness state of Weyland’s disaster and evacuation planning had been, well, disastrous, though. And Faraday was certainly correct about the possibility of accidents. There hadn’t been a major catastrophe aboard any of the Star Empire’s main industrial platforms in decades, but there’d been several moderately severe accidents, and catastrophe was always possible, however improbable it might seem. If that had happened aboard Weyland a few weeks earlier, personnel losses might have been cataclysmic.
The series of of simulations Faraday had ordered had created a great deal of anger and frustration. At the same time, his grumpy subordinates had finally been forced to accept that he was serious about trying to get them off the station alive if something went wrong. They might not have been happy about it, but they’d at least started going through the motions with something resembling efficiency.
Of course, they’d known it was only going to be simulations, which would let them get back to work on more serious concerns after a half-hour or so of nonsense. Until this morning, that was, when the exercise had concluded with the words “this is no sim.”
Which was basically all the warning they’d gotten before their life pods blasted out of the station and headed for Gryphon . . . ​whose authorities had had no more notion they might be coming than they’d had that they might be going. The planetary authorities’ disaster and evacuation planning for Weyland had come up a little short, as well, with the station’s personnel jammed into whatever improvised holding stations they could come up with while they tried to figure out what to do with them. Since they were supposed to already have detailed plans for doing just that, the current planetary fubar probably wasn’t going to make Vice Admiral Faraday very popular with them when their efficiency reports—or their civilian equivalents—got written.
“All in all, a good day’s work,” Faraday concluded. “I figure we should be able to start re-docking the fabrication section’s pods in a couple of days. I want to start there, at any rate.”
“May I ask why, Sir?” Howell asked with a slight sense of trepidation.
“Indeed you may,” Faraday replied with a sharklike smile. “While we’re re-docking Fabrication’s pods and recertifying Research’s pods, you and I, and Admiral Yeager, and a security team from ONI which just happens to’ve been in-system when I called this little exercise, are going to do a walk-through. We’ll be sending an updated backup down to Gryphon for storage just in case. And we’re also going to see just how many of Yeager’s worker bees remembered to secure their classified data properly before heading for their pods.”
“Ouch!” Howell’s wince wasn’t entirely feigned, and Faraday chuckled nastily.
“I’m already unpopular with them, Marcus. I might as well go whole hog and kill as many birds as possible while I’m chucking stones. And I already warned Yaeger this was coming. I won’t say she’s looking forward to it, but she understands why I’m doing it and that I’m not going to deliberately collect any more heads than I have to.
“Which, unfortunately, doesn’t mean some aren’t going to roll anyway, of course.”
Howell nodded again. Some people never seemed to understand that military efficiency demanded a certain degree of ruthlessness. Military commanders weren’t—or shouldn’t be, at any rate—in the business of winning popularity contests. They should be in the business of promoting the efficiency, which definitely included the survivability, of the units under their command. Not only was it a CO’s duty to prune away deadwood, but it was also his responsibility to make all the personnel under his command aware of the fact that he’d do that pruning, with ruthless dispatch, whenever it was required. Punishing those who screwed up in order “to encourage the others” had been an axiom of military discipline for so many centuries because, whether it was nice or not, it worked.
Punishment may not be the best possible motivator, but it’s one that works, Howell thought. And it’s one any effective officer has to have in his toolbox for the times when it’s the only one that will. And at least Claudio understands the nuts and bolts of positive motivation, as well. Now that he’s got their attention, at least.
The chief of staff’s lips twitched on the brink of a smile, but he suppressed it and paged to the next item on his electronic notepad.
“All right, Sir. I’m going to assume from what you’ve just said that you want us to give the immediate priority to getting the fabrication section’s life pods back aboard. Having said that, though, there’s the question of Engineering. In particular—”
✧ ✧ ✧
Millions upon millions of kilometers from Vice Admiral Claudio’s day cabin, shoals of missile pods continued to bore through space at twenty percent of the speed of light, and the visible disks of the stars called Manticore-A and Manticore-B grew steadily larger before them.

***Skip to middle of Chapter 30***

The silence in the conference room was even deeper and darker, and White Haven seemed to give himself a little shake.
“The solitary bright spot I’ve so far been able to find—aside from the fact that Trevor’s Star is still intact—is that Weyland was virtually empty when the attack went in.” Several people blinked in surprise, and White Haven’s lips twitched in something which might one day become a smile once more. “Vice Admiral Faraday had scheduled a surprise emergency evacuation exercise. Given the interruption in the station’s operations—not to mention the expense and the disruption of government services on Gryphon when all those life pods dropped in so unexpectedly—I imagine Faraday probably anticipated taking more than a little flak over his exercise.” The ghost of a smile disappeared. “As it happens, he doesn’t have to worry about that anymore. He and his staff were aboard when the station was destroyed. All of them were lost, as was almost all of the station’s senior command crew and a quarter of its engineering staff. But because of his exercise, the entire R&D staff and over ninety-five percent of the station’s manufacturing workforce—and, thank God, their families—were on the planet and survived. That workforce will be literally invaluable when we start trying to rebuild.”
Italics are the author's, boldface and underlined text is my emphasis.

Note that fabrication is manufacturing.
-------------------------------------------------------------
History does not repeat itself so much as it echoes.
Top
Re: Stories you wish were told?
Post by Fox2!   » Sat Aug 27, 2016 2:46 pm

Fox2!
Captain of the List

Posts: 541
Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 1:34 am
Location: Huntsville, AL

dscott8 wrote:IA dedicated anti-piracy/slavery intelligence service would be cool too.


It's called the BSC. :lol:
Top
Re: Stories you wish were told?
Post by Fox2!   » Sat Aug 27, 2016 2:49 pm

Fox2!
Captain of the List

Posts: 541
Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 1:34 am
Location: Huntsville, AL

Weird Harold wrote:
Theemile wrote:Why would Sidemore need any of that now? Piracy in the area is trending down drastically post-Silesia reapportionment. Give it 5 years and the Silesia region will be the quietist in space.

All Sidemore will need is a nice SDF and a handful of light ships for "routine" commerce protection.


Sidemore probably doesn't need "any of that" now. But the requested story was pre-partition and as a Manticoran Ally engaged in piracy suppression in the area.

It might be worth noting that Sidemore is NOT part of Silesia and a crackdown on pirates and corruption in the Silesian Protectorates by both the IAN and RMN could well force piracy to move outside of the Silesian Protectorates. Sidemore might well need more anti-piracy capability instead of less.


Don't forget that Sidemore is home to an RMN Fleet Station. Pirates or freebooters would have to deal with that, as well as any local SDF.
Top
Re: Stories you wish were told?
Post by Fox2!   » Sat Aug 27, 2016 2:59 pm

Fox2!
Captain of the List

Posts: 541
Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 1:34 am
Location: Huntsville, AL

Vince wrote:
Fox2! wrote:The other question is what happened to Ginger and Wanderman. He was on the fab side, which was not evacuated. She was on R&D, but the senior staff was going to perform an inspection for proper storage of classified material, etc., before the boffins evacuated.

Did they both, somehow, survive? Just one? Neither?

Weyland evacuation details:
Mission of Honor wrote:End of Chapter 27

“Well, I’m undoubtedly the most unpopular officer in Weyland,” Claudio Faraday said with an air of satisfaction. “For that matter, I might well be the most unpopular officer in the entire Beta subsystem!”
“I think that might be going just a bit far, Sir,” Marcus Howell replied. “At least as far as the entire subsystem’s concerned. Although, now that I think about it, they probably aren’t too fond of you down on Gryphon at the moment, either.”
“Nope. And I imagine I may be hearing a little something from the bean-counters back at Admiralty House, too.” Faraday sounded a bit more serious, but his air of contentment was unabated. “We’ve probably just written off—what? ten percent?—of the station’s life pods, after all.”
“Not to mention shutting down the entire R&D section until we get the pods recertified, Sir,” Howell pointed out respectfully.
“Oh, thank you for recalling that little detail to my attention, Marcus!”
“One of the things chiefs of staff are for, Sir.”
Faraday glowered at him, but the vice admiral didn’t seem able to work up much wattage. Then he allowed his chair to come upright, planted his elbows on his desk, and leaned forward over his folded forearms.
“Actually,” he said much more seriously, “the downtime bothers me most. But I don’t expect Admiral Hemphill to kick up much dust over it. I know most people think of her as the tech weenies’ tech weenie, but she’s got a lot better understanding of the realities than some of her research people out here do.” He shook his head. “Frankly, I think quite a few of them haven’t figured out they’re actually in the Navy and hence subject to the Service’s little foibles, like making sure they’re up to date on relevant emergency procedures. And even for most of the others, the thought that anyone might possibly want to hurt them never enters their minds! Which doesn’t even consider the fact that genuine accidents can happen even aboard the most modern space station.”
Howell nodded. He wasn’t sure he agreed with Faraday’s decision to actually evacuate the space station and send all but a tiny caretaker detachment down to the planet Gryphon. He was perfectly ready to admit that the readiness state of Weyland’s disaster and evacuation planning had been, well, disastrous, though. And Faraday was certainly correct about the possibility of accidents. There hadn’t been a major catastrophe aboard any of the Star Empire’s main industrial platforms in decades, but there’d been several moderately severe accidents, and catastrophe was always possible, however improbable it might seem. If that had happened aboard Weyland a few weeks earlier, personnel losses might have been cataclysmic.
The series of of simulations Faraday had ordered had created a great deal of anger and frustration. At the same time, his grumpy subordinates had finally been forced to accept that he was serious about trying to get them off the station alive if something went wrong. They might not have been happy about it, but they’d at least started going through the motions with something resembling efficiency.
Of course, they’d known it was only going to be simulations, which would let them get back to work on more serious concerns after a half-hour or so of nonsense. Until this morning, that was, when the exercise had concluded with the words “this is no sim.”
Which was basically all the warning they’d gotten before their life pods blasted out of the station and headed for Gryphon . . . ​whose authorities had had no more notion they might be coming than they’d had that they might be going. The planetary authorities’ disaster and evacuation planning for Weyland had come up a little short, as well, with the station’s personnel jammed into whatever improvised holding stations they could come up with while they tried to figure out what to do with them. Since they were supposed to already have detailed plans for doing just that, the current planetary fubar probably wasn’t going to make Vice Admiral Faraday very popular with them when their efficiency reports—or their civilian equivalents—got written.
“All in all, a good day’s work,” Faraday concluded. “I figure we should be able to start re-docking the fabrication section’s pods in a couple of days. I want to start there, at any rate.”
“May I ask why, Sir?” Howell asked with a slight sense of trepidation.
“Indeed you may,” Faraday replied with a sharklike smile. “While we’re re-docking Fabrication’s pods and recertifying Research’s pods, you and I, and Admiral Yeager, and a security team from ONI which just happens to’ve been in-system when I called this little exercise, are going to do a walk-through. We’ll be sending an updated backup down to Gryphon for storage just in case. And we’re also going to see just how many of Yeager’s worker bees remembered to secure their classified data properly before heading for their pods.”
“Ouch!” Howell’s wince wasn’t entirely feigned, and Faraday chuckled nastily.
“I’m already unpopular with them, Marcus. I might as well go whole hog and kill as many birds as possible while I’m chucking stones. And I already warned Yaeger this was coming. I won’t say she’s looking forward to it, but she understands why I’m doing it and that I’m not going to deliberately collect any more heads than I have to.
“Which, unfortunately, doesn’t mean some aren’t going to roll anyway, of course.”
Howell nodded again. Some people never seemed to understand that military efficiency demanded a certain degree of ruthlessness. Military commanders weren’t—or shouldn’t be, at any rate—in the business of winning popularity contests. They should be in the business of promoting the efficiency, which definitely included the survivability, of the units under their command. Not only was it a CO’s duty to prune away deadwood, but it was also his responsibility to make all the personnel under his command aware of the fact that he’d do that pruning, with ruthless dispatch, whenever it was required. Punishing those who screwed up in order “to encourage the others” had been an axiom of military discipline for so many centuries because, whether it was nice or not, it worked.
Punishment may not be the best possible motivator, but it’s one that works, Howell thought. And it’s one any effective officer has to have in his toolbox for the times when it’s the only one that will. And at least Claudio understands the nuts and bolts of positive motivation, as well. Now that he’s got their attention, at least.
The chief of staff’s lips twitched on the brink of a smile, but he suppressed it and paged to the next item on his electronic notepad.
“All right, Sir. I’m going to assume from what you’ve just said that you want us to give the immediate priority to getting the fabrication section’s life pods back aboard. Having said that, though, there’s the question of Engineering. In particular—”
✧ ✧ ✧
Millions upon millions of kilometers from Vice Admiral Claudio’s day cabin, shoals of missile pods continued to bore through space at twenty percent of the speed of light, and the visible disks of the stars called Manticore-A and Manticore-B grew steadily larger before them.

***Skip to middle of Chapter 30***

The silence in the conference room was even deeper and darker, and White Haven seemed to give himself a little shake.
“The solitary bright spot I’ve so far been able to find—aside from the fact that Trevor’s Star is still intact—is that Weyland was virtually empty when the attack went in.” Several people blinked in surprise, and White Haven’s lips twitched in something which might one day become a smile once more. “Vice Admiral Faraday had scheduled a surprise emergency evacuation exercise. Given the interruption in the station’s operations—not to mention the expense and the disruption of government services on Gryphon when all those life pods dropped in so unexpectedly—I imagine Faraday probably anticipated taking more than a little flak over his exercise.” The ghost of a smile disappeared. “As it happens, he doesn’t have to worry about that anymore. He and his staff were aboard when the station was destroyed. All of them were lost, as was almost all of the station’s senior command crew and a quarter of its engineering staff. But because of his exercise, the entire R&D staff and over ninety-five percent of the station’s manufacturing workforce—and, thank God, their families—were on the planet and survived. That workforce will be literally invaluable when we start trying to rebuild.”
Italics are the author's, boldface and underlined text is my emphasis.

Note that fabrication is manufacturing.


Ah, forgot that it was a station wide exercise. So SCPO Wanderman probably survived. But wasn't Ginger part of ADM Yeager's senior staff? Time to find the books.
Top
Re: Stories you wish were told?
Post by kzt   » Sat Aug 27, 2016 3:04 pm

kzt
Fleet Admiral

Posts: 9581
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:18 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM

Fox2! wrote:Ah, forgot that it was a station wide exercise. So SCPO Wanderman probably survived. But wasn't Ginger part of ADM Yeager's senior staff? Time to find the books.

Didn't she walk in as some young fool was running his mouth on the planet?
Top
Re: Stories you wish were told?
Post by Vince   » Sat Aug 27, 2016 3:20 pm

Vince
Vice Admiral

Posts: 1547
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2010 11:43 pm

kzt wrote:
Fox2! wrote:Ah, forgot that it was a station wide exercise. So SCPO Wanderman probably survived. But wasn't Ginger part of ADM Yeager's senior staff? Time to find the books.
Didn't she walk in as some young fool was running his mouth on the planet?

No, that was Commander Anastasia McGillicuddy:
Mission of Honor, Chapter 27 wrote:If only there were some way he could quietly and discreetly leave the small classroom in which their party of evacuees had been instructed to wait. Unfortunately, there wasn’t one, and Berkeley happened to be the senior officer present, which put him in charge of their small detachment. If Paulo tried to sneak out, the lieutenant would demand to know where he was going, and somehow “anywhere you aren’t” didn’t seem the most diplomatic possible response. Truthful, yes; diplomatic, no.
“And if we just had to do something this stupid,” Berkeley continued, “at least we could have done it when we weren’t—”
“Excuse me, Lieutenant,” a contralto voice said from the doorway, “but exactly what ‘stupid’ something did you have in mind?”
Berkeley’s mouth shut with an almost audible click, and he spun towards the slender, dark-haired commander standing in the open door with her head cocked to one side.
“I, uh, didn’t see you there, Commander McGillicuddy,” he said.
“No,” Commander Anastasia McGillicuddy agreed pleasantly. “I don’t suppose you did. However, I was just passing through when I heard what sounded remarkably like a raised voice. I was down at the end of the hall, you understand, so I wasn’t completely certain that was what I was hearing. I decided to find out.”

Her smile was as pleasant as her tone, but her brown eyes were cold, and the much taller and bulkier Berkeley seemed to shrink slightly.
“As I drew closer, I realized you were availing yourself of this opportunity to continue the instruction of the junior officers entrusted to your care,” she went on. “I was impressed by your apparent vigor. Obviously, you’d been discussing a subject you felt strongly about. So I thought I’d take this opportunity to find out what it was.”
“Ma’am, I was just—that is, well . . .” Berkeley’s abortive response trailed off, and despite himself, Paulo actually felt a feeble—very feeble—flicker of sympathy.
He throttled it without difficulty.
“Should I assume, Lieutenant, that you question Vice Admiral Faraday’s priorities?” McGillicuddy asked softly.
Berkeley said nothing at all, and her nostrils flared. Then she looked past Berkeley to the junior officers and enlisted waiting in the classroom. She considered them briefly, then returned her attention to Berkeley.
“Since you feel qualified to critique this exercise, Lieutenant,” she told him, “I’ll arrange for you to present your view of it directly to Captain Sugihara.” Berkeley’s fair complexion turned considerably fairer at the mention of Captain Brian Sugihara, Rear Admiral Trammell’s XO. “In the meantime, I strongly suggest you give some consideration to the appropriateness of your present forum. Especially considering that you happen to be the senior officer present. You might want to spend the time more profitably doing something like . . . ​oh, I don’t know. Considering your report to Captain Sugihara, perhaps. In fact, you might want to give a little thought to whether or not Article Ten figures into your thinking, as well.”
Paulo felt his lips trying to purse in a silent whistle as that last salvo landed. Obviously McGillicuddy had heard even more—and was even more pissed off—than he’d thought. From the little Paulo had seen of her, she didn’t seem like the sort who normally screamed at a subordinate—even a stupid subordinate—in front of that subordinate’s juniors. The fact that Berkeley had ticked her off enough to do that was sufficiently significant on its own, but her last sentence had been so pointed not even Berkeley could miss the implication. Article Ten was the article which forbade actions or speech prejudicial to discipline and the chain of command. If Berkeley was brought up on that charge and it went into his personnel record . . . 
McGillicuddy held Berkeley’s eyes for another few seconds, then nodded, glanced once at the breathlessly watching group of JGs, ensigns, and enlisted, and left without another word.
Italics are the author's, boldface is my emphasis.
-------------------------------------------------------------
History does not repeat itself so much as it echoes.
Top
Re: Stories you wish were told?
Post by Somtaaw   » Sat Aug 27, 2016 3:23 pm

Somtaaw
Rear Admiral

Posts: 1013
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2014 11:36 am
Location: Canada

kzt wrote:
Fox2! wrote:Ah, forgot that it was a station wide exercise. So SCPO Wanderman probably survived. But wasn't Ginger part of ADM Yeager's senior staff? Time to find the books.

Didn't she walk in as some young fool was running his mouth on the planet?


That was another hardass, but I'm pretty certain Ginger survived. Gotta find the relevant passages though
Top
Re: Stories you wish were told?
Post by runsforcelery   » Sat Aug 27, 2016 3:56 pm

runsforcelery
First Space Lord

Posts: 2216
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 11:39 am
Location: South Carolina

Somtaaw wrote:
kzt wrote:Didn't she walk in as some young fool was running his mouth on the planet?


That was another hardass, but I'm pretty certain Ginger survived. Gotta find the relevant passages though




For those fretting about Ginger, a brief out of order snippet from after the Yawata Strike:

____________________________________________
She thought about ignoring it — Captain Mathis had been right; she had a lot of reading to catch up on, she was due to go aboard Charles Ward in less than an hour, and her baggage hadn’t caught up with her — but for all she knew sanity had broken out at the Admiralty and one of Mathis’ superiors was screening her to tell her it had all been a mistake.

Part of her hoped that was exactly what it was.

The signal pinged again and she hit the acceptance key, opening a window in the corner of her display. Then she twitched upright in her shuttle seat.

“Ms. Terekhov!”

“I’ve told you before, Ginger. Ms. Terekhov is Aivars’ mother. My name is Sinead.”

“Well —” Ginger began, then stopped, closed her mouth, and smiled. “Sorry. I’ll try to remember, but it’s hard. I still think of you as ‘the Skipper’s wife,’ I’m afraid.”


"Oh, bother!" said Pooh, as Piglet came back from the dead.
Top

Return to Honorverse